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Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama (1988) – Episode 142 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“It’s too bad we had to kill her. I really liked the outfit she had on.” 80s scream queen Linnea Quigley as Spider delivers her lines in SORORITY BABES IN THE SLIMEBALL BOWL-O-RAMA as only she can – classic. This week brings a campy cult classic to the podcast from director David DeCoteau. Christopher G. Moore is joined by co-host, Doc Rotten, and special guest-host, Vanessa Thompson, to discuss the first film to pair up Linnea Quigley, Michelle Bauer, and Brinke Stevens. Suddenly, all was right in the horror world, but watch out for that Imp!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 142 – Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama (1988)

Christopher has been clamoring for this film to be included on the podcast since long before he joined the show. It’s been mentioned in passing and has been included on Patreon polls again and again, but it never seems to quite land in the right spot at the right time. Well, that all changed when HNR co-host, podcasting rockstar, and international cosplay queen, Vanessa Thompson,  mentioned watching the film on the Joe Bob Briggs’ Last Drive-In Special which played on Shudder. And…that’s all it took. Finally, the Grue-crew tackle a schlocky genre film with one of the best titles ever to grace a VHS cover, Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama. Hold on to your Imps.

This film feels very much like a “Charles Band” film, director David DeCoteau brings an innocent but dirty charm to the film with his direction, shot choices, and cast. Linnea Quigley, Michelle Bauer, and Brinke Stevens elevate the moniker of Scream Queen with their delightfully deadpan but incredibly humorous turns as Spider, Lisa, and Taffy. The Imp paves the way for future “Band” creations such as the Puppets in Puppet Master, Gingerdead Man, and other campy creatures. There are 80s cinematic classics that push the envelope, then there are films like Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama – and, sometimes, that’s all you need. Enjoy!

As part of a sorority ritual, pledges and their male companions steal a trophy from a bowling alley; unbeknownst to them, it contains a devilish imp who makes their lives a living Hell.

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Parasite (1982) – Episode 141 – Decades of Horror 1980s

Once it gets inside you, it will do anything to get out!” the tagline for Parasite 3-D .promised buckets of 3-D gruesome gore. The film partially delivers with Stan Winston creature effects that hold up and the presence of a young Demi Moore. And, then there is the 3-D, effective and restrained, not as over-the-top as later films or the previous Comin’ At You. Christopher G. Moore is joined by co-host, Doc Rotten to discuss a Charles Band classic seen in its original 3-D presentation at the Carolina Theater in Durham, North Carolina..

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 141 – Parasite (1982)

On Horror News Radio, week after week, as the Grue-Crew mentioned the upcoming Splatterflix Film Series, Christopher shared his memories of seeing stills from Parasite in Fangoria, specifically the shot of a victim with a hollow pipe sticking out of his chest with blood dripping out the far end. Each week, we would eagerly announce that Parasite would be showing at the event. To see Parasite in 3-D would certainly be amazing. On Saturday, October 13, 2018, Christopher is finally able to see this scene on the big screen…and in its original 3-D presentation thanks to Jim Carl, from the Carolina Theater and Harry Guerro, from Exhumed Films. Finally, all is right in the world.

But, let’s not forget this is a Charles Band film. Despite his reputation, Parasite proves there is more to the low-budget legendary director than mere schlock and exploitation…well, yes, there remains plenty of that too; but…the film holds up remarkably well. This is mostly due to the terrific early effects work from Stan Winston, a quick plot, and retro-fueled fascination in its 80s 3-D work. While not a masterpiece by any stretch of the imagination, it may be better than the discouraging reviews heaped upon the film during its release. Christopher and Doc take a look at the film, the cast, the director, the 3-D, and the Parasite creature itself this week. It’s in 3-D, so you know Doc is happy. Ha! Take a listen, and you may be convinced to give the film a second chance…maybe.

Paul Dean has created a deadly parasite that is now attached to his stomach. He and his female companion, Patricia Welles, must find a way to destroy it while also trying to avoid Ricus, his rednecks, and an evil government agent named Merchant.

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Maximum Overdrive (1986) – Episode 140 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“Stephen King’s masterpiece of terror directed by the master himself.” the tagline for Maximum Overdrive promises the masterpiece horror film of 1986. Hell, the trailer amped up that pledge with Mr. King proclaiming he would “scare the hell out you!” However, when the machines take over the world, shit gets real. Christopher G. Moore is joined by Stephen King aficionado, Dave Dreher.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 140 – Maximum Overdrive (1986)

Filmed in Wilmington, North Carolina, Maximum Overdrive brought not only the Stephen King short story Trucks to the big screen but also had the maestro himself behind the wheel providing the screenplay and sitting in the director’s chair. While the film tanked at the box office upon its 1986 release, it has garnered a cult following over the years with the “Green Goblin” truck becoming iconic, the bombastic AC/DC soundtrack, and the legendary rumors of on-set turmoil & chaos. The cast includes Emilio Estevez, Pat Hingle, and Laura Harrington.

Christopher G. Moore and Dave Dreher revisit the classic/no-so-classic monster-piece recounting the time they saw the film for the first time and how it holds up today. They discuss its path to becoming a cult classic and the troubles and rumors along the way. The cast and the effects are examined along with the conflicting internal logic the film sometimes follows. It’s all here for a special episode demanded by the DoH listeners: Maximum Overdrive.

When Earth passes through the tail of Rea-M rogue comet, the machines come to life and start to kill mankind. A group of survivors is under siege from fierce trucks at the Dixie Boy truck stop gas station and they have to fight to survive.

 

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Mausoleum (1983) – Episode 139 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“What Evil Lives In The… Mausoleum” the tagline for Mausoleum sets us up for a bizarre, zany, gory, and often super-silly overlooked horror classic from 1983! The film features Bobbie Bresee in – and out – of full monster make-up complete with… monster boobs. Practical effects for the win! Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore are joined by Lunchmeat VHS madman Josh Schafer.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 139 – Mausoleum (1983)

One of the few, if not only, films from director Michael Dugan and writers Robert Barich, Robert Maderon, and Katherine Rosenwink, Mausoleum represents a group of filmmakers desperately crafting their epic horror film. The movie is an often overlook early VHS horror classic with Bobbie Bresee in the lead staring opposite Marjoe Gortner. Norman Burton, Maurice Sherbanee, and LeWanda Page round out the cast. Given this film’s history tied more to its VHS release than its lukewarm DVD release, the Grue-Crew have invited Josh Schafer to return to the podcast. Josh is the man behind Lunchmeat VHS and set up Video Vortex at the Alamo Draft House in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Josh shares how Mausoleum was a VHS staple for him growing up, watching the film over and over from the local video store. Doc shares that he caught the film first at a drive-in double feature paired with Lucio Fulci’s The Gates of Hell. The film is perhaps best remembered for its better than expected, if not spectacular, monster designs and effects. If nothing else, the demon monster in Mausoleum is a memorable creation with its glowing green eyes, snarling mouth, and… yeah… monster-faced boobs. What else can you say? Sigh.

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The Lost Boys (1987) – Episode 137 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“Sleep all day. Party all night. Never grow old. Never die. It’s fun to be a vampire.” The tag-line for The Lost Boys (1987) captures the “Peter Pan” spirit of this classic Eighties vampire tale, romanticizing the creatures in an approachable and thrilling young adult spin without sacrificing the horror and the thrills. No sparkles here, folks! Josh Schafer joins Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to revisit the film that solidified Joel Schumacher as a directing talent…well, at least until bat-nipples did him in.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 137 – The Lost Boys (1987)

Released in 1987, The Lost Boys introduced horror fans to a variety of iconic horror flash and style rarely matched in this day-and-age. This is the first film to provide fans with the “Two-Coreys” teaming Corey Haim and Corey Feldman together – even though Feldman has Jamison Newlander and Frog Brothers wingman. Keifer Sutherland makes a striking impression as David, the blonde leader of the gothic punk vampires and Jason Patric (son of Exorcist star Jason Miller) emo-acts his way into every young girl’s heart. And, above all, we have shirtless, oiled Timmy Cappello belting out “I Still Beleive” – what else do you need.

Christopher G. Moore, Doc Rotten, and guest-host Josh Schafer from Lunchmeat VHS gather to take a look at The Lost Boys perhaps one of the best and most influential vampire movies of the Eighties. The Grue-Crew debate the merit of director Joel Schumacher and whether Grampa was a werewolf in an alternate “Mandela Effect” universe. It’s all about the style, the clothes, the stars, and the songs; The Lost Boys holds up well after 30+ years and the Grue-Crew reflect on it all. “One thing about living in Santa Carla I never could stomach; all the damn vampires.”

A mother and her two sons move to a small coast town in California. The town is plagued by bikers and some mysterious deaths. The younger boy makes friends with two other boys who claim to be vampire hunters while the older boy is drawn into the gang of bikers by a beautiful girl. The older boy starts sleeping days and staying out all night while the younger boy starts getting into trouble because of his friends’ obsession.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at christopher@gruesomemagazine.com or dave@gruesomemagazine.com or docrotten@gruesomemagazine.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Episode

Predator

The movie “The Lost Boys” (1987) was Directed by Joel Schumacher and cast members (l to r) Brooke McCarter, Billy Wirth, Chance Michael Corbitt, Kiefer Sutherland, Jami Gertz and Alex Winter .

 

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Horror-Themed Music Videos of the 1980s – Episode 135 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“Darkness falls across the land. The midnight hour is close at hand. Creatures crawl in search of blood. To terrorize y’all’s neighborhood.” Vincent Price helps make Michael Jackson’s Thriller one of the best horror-themed music videos of the 1980s along with director John Landis and special make-up effects designed and created by Rick Baker. Breaking out of our norm of covering horror films of the decades, for our special 2nd year anniversary episode we dive into the music videos that defined the Eighties, especially those with a tinge of horror to them. Join Dave Dreher, Christopher G. Moore, and Doc Rotten on this special visit back to when MTV played music videos 24×7 and some of them were as scary as they were awesome…well, in most cases…

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 135 – Horror-Themed Music Videos of the 1980s

For this episode, with the help of previous co-host and Decades of Horror co-founder Thomas Mariani, we dropped a list of 15 horror-themed music videos for the grue-believers to vote on. The top 10 of that list, we discuss on this podcast. We also present some missed classics as provided by fans of the show and some congratulations on our 2nd anniversary. Thank you all for participating and listening.

The Top 10 Horror-Themed Music Videos

  • 10 Total Eclipse of the Heart by Bonnie Tyler (2/83)
  • 09 Killer Klowns from Outer Space by the Dickies (88)
  • 08 Bark at the Moon by Ozzy Osbourne (83)
  • 07 Dancing with Myself by Billy Idol (82)
  • 06 Who Made Who by AC/DC (86)
  • 05 Pet Sematary by Ramones (89)
  • 04 He’s Back (Man Behind the Mask) by Alice Cooper (86)
  • 03 Dream Warriors by Dokken (87)
  • 02 Somebody’s Watching Me by Rockwell (84)
  • 01 Thriller by Michael Jackson (12/83)

The Ones We Missed

  • Dirk Rogers: Torture by the Jackson 5, TV Dinners by ZZ Top
  • Jane Smith: Too Much Blood by The Rolling Stones
  • Brian Davis: Lost in the Shadows by Lou Gramm from the Lost Boys soundtrack
  • John Doe: Land of Confusion by Genesis
  • Sean Henry: Rob zombie’s Dragula (Not the 80’s but it still rocks!)
  • Luis Franco: That “Somebody’s Watching Me” by Rockwell scared the shit out of me as a kid. Man,I miss the 80’s. The idea of a mini-movie to go with a song is a lost art. MTV is just not MTV anymore. There was 3 crazy sci-fi themed videos whose songs had nothing to with the video; Billy Ocean’s “Loverboy” KC & The Sunshine Band’s “Give It Up, Duran Duran’s “The Wildboys“.Worth watching if you’ve never seen any of them.
  • Jerry Chandler: My Name is Norman Bates (1981) by Landscape; Pet Shop Boys: Heart (1988) if just for the sheer WTF of seeing Ian McKellen as a vampire lip syncing Pet Shop Boys; Metallica’s One (1989) that’s a whole different kind of horror.
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Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988) – Episode 134 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“There’s a legend ’round here. A killer buried, but not dead. A curse on Crystal Lake, a death curse: Jason Voorhees’ curse.” Our narrator (Walt “Crazy Ralph” Gorney) details the legend of Jason Voorhees. After being stuck at the bottom of Camp Crystal Lake in the last film, Jason is awoken by a young lady named Tina (Lar Park Lincoln) with psychic abilities. It’s essentially Carrie vs. Jason… at least that’s the intent. So is this a slashing entry in the franchise or is Pamela going to warn her son that “They’re All Gonna Laugh at You?” Listen to find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 134 – Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)

Released in 1988, Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood came out near the end of the slasher genre’s reign. It was a time when the MPAA became more critical of violence, causing the iconic kills the franchise was known for to be cut down severely. Director John Carl Buechler has been publically against how this turned out and we’ve only seen daily footage of the kills. Some of them were pretty gruesome, but alas not to be. Which makes some of the teen stuff all the more of a slog to get through.

Luckily, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore, and Thomas Mariani are here to take a closer look at Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood. All of them appreciate the final fight with Tina and the ambition of having a superpowered heroine fight Jason. Especially when that Jason is played for the first time by iconic stuntman Kane Hodder. Yet, there’s plenty of issues to have with the editing and lack originality amongst the supporting cast. All this and more is discussed on Decades of Horror 1980s!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Remember to vote in our two year anniversary poll about The Top 10 Best 80s Horror Music Videos!

Next Episode

Top 10 Best 80s Horror Themed Music Videos!

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Jaws 3-D (1983) – Special Edition – Decades of Horror 1980s

“The Third Dimension is TERROR” The tagline for Jaws 3-D works hard to convince its audience that the film is full of chills and thrills. Buried in the Eighties coming-at-you 3-D effects is a butchered story about the Brody boys all grown up and facing a great white shark of their own…at a famous sea park, no less. Dennis Quaid and Bess Armstrong lead the cast while first-time (and only-time) director Joe Alves lobs fish, arms, and shark teeth into the audience’s lap. Seen in 3-D for this episode, Thomas, Doc, and Christopher are joined by Paul Cardullo to relish in the wacky 1983 cinematic fad.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Special Edition – Jaws 3-D (1983)

Jaws 3-D credits the legendary Richard Matheson as its screenwriter. The resulting film, however, does not feel like any other example of Matheson’s work. He has gone on record stating his original script was “bedeviled by script-doctors.”  Along with Quaid and Armstrong, the cast includes Leah Thompson, Simon MacCorkindale, and Louis Gosset Jr. while the film includes two sharks, the classic “Bruce” great white is nowhere to be seen. Yes, despite its flaws, the film is stupid fun in its original 3-D form and was a success in its time holding the record for highest gross for a 3-D film until Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over in 2003

Guest host Paul Cardullo joined Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to catch Jaws 3-D presented in 3D at the FantasticRealm Film Series at The Carolina Theater in Durham, North Carolina while Thomas is confined to the standard “flat” edition. Thomas has yet to forgive Doc for this… In addition to Jaws 3-D, the Grue-Crew discuss the other four 3-D films featured during the series: Starchaser: The Legend of Orin (1985), Metalstorm: The Destruction of Jared-Syn (1983), Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone (1983), Treasure of the Four Crowns (1983). Doc Rotten also had the opportunity to interview Jim Carl, the director of the film series about 3D films, who reveals what The Carolina has in store for horror fans and Harry Guerro, from Exhumed Films, discusses 3-D films, his collection of cinema history, and some of the most rare 3-D films in existence.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Remember to vote in our two year anniversary poll about The Top 10 Best 80s Horror Music Videos!

Next Episode

Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)

 

 

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The Gate (1987) – Episode 133 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“Demons aren’t gonna ring the doorbell!” Terry (Louis Tripp) gives his buddy Glen (Stephen Dorff) a lesson in demon etiquette. Yes, the cult favorite gateway horror film The Gate is much beloved by horror fans of the 1980s. So much so that it won our Patreon Decades of Horror Poll for the month of April! Yes, those who at least pay $1 a month got to choose this episode’s topic of The Gate. So grab a shovel and your favorite subliminal death metal albums as we try to squash out some demons before they disrupt our 80s house party!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 133 – The Gate (1987)

The Gate is a relatively simple story. Young Glen and his older sister Al (Christa Denton) have the house to themselves for the weekend while their parents are out. So, while Al is having her friends over for a big party, Glen and his friend Terry are dealing with a mysterious geode they found in the sinkhole in the backyard. That geode manages to scrawl some incantation on a notepad that the kids read, unleashing demons upon their suburban house. Corpses from walls, dads with melting faces and moms-turned-to-dogs ensue from there.

To dissect this horror film for all ages, kids at heart Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani exhume what’s in the hole for The Gate. While all three originally saw this well out of the target demographic, this trio appreciates many things about this gateway horror film. Christopher loves the subtle bits of filmmaking craft. Doc learns to appreciate the believable child performances. Thomas wonders if Stephen Dorff peaked to early. It’s just too metal a podcast to handle. Better drape yourself in a sheet and lip sync to some demonic songs before the little demons bite your leg!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Remember to vote in our two year anniversary poll about The Top 10 Best 80s Horror Music Videos!

Next Episode

Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)
Plus, our Jaws 3D (1983) Bonus Episode!

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Beetlejuice (1988) – Episode 132 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“It’s Showtime!” Beetlejuice (Michael Keaton) gets his show on the road. So why not listen as The Grue Crew does the same?! Celebrating its 30th anniversary this month, Beetlejuice was the film that launched Tim Burton’s career. A horror comedy covered in spirals, normalcy satire and gothic pondering that made Burton the most mainstream recognized auteur of the modern era. However, does Beetlejuice make us Shake Senora or does it deserved to be gobbled up by a sandworm? Tune in and find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 132 – Beetlejuice (1988)

Beetlejuice is an odd choice for a titular character, given he’s only in about 17 minutes of the final film. Then again, Keaton’s a pop culture creep with a disgusting charm who makes a huge impression for the limited time. Yet, our protagonists are the newly deceased couple of Adam (Alec Baldwin) and Martha Maitland (Geena Davis) who are stuck in their home and can’t stop it from being sold to new owners. Those new owners are The Deetzes, including the goth daughter Lydia (Winona Ryder) who can see them.. The Maitlands need to get these folks out of their eternal resting place, so they utilize the world of the dead’s rules to their advantage and get the titular ghoul to help out. Betrayal, stop motion and Harry Belafonte ensue from there.

Thomas, Doc Rotten, and Christopher G. Moore crack open their copies of The Handbook for the Recently Deceased to decipher Beetlejuice. Doc admits having fallen back in love with this after some Tim Burton overexposure. Christopher G. Moore revels in his love for all things striped and goth. Thomas just loves how the character and world building meld so well. There’s appreciation for everything from the production design to the diverse musical soundtrack to Dick Cavett’s underrated acting ability. Plus they all agree that “…IT KEEPS GETTIN’ FUNNIER, EVERY TIME THEY SEE IT!”

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

The Gate (1987), Our Patreon Poll Winner!