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Salem’s Lot (1979) – Episode 69 – Decades of Horror 1970s

“Open the window, Mark. Please! Let me in! It’s OK, Mark, I’m your friend. He commands it!” If a floating Glick boy ever says this to you, no matter what, don’t open the window!  Doc Rotten is off on assignment for this episode, but regular hosts Jeff Mohr, Bill Mulligan, and Chad Hunt are joined by Joey Fittos, the Thug with a Mug, as they travel to the not-so-quaint and disturbing New England village of Salem’s Lot to discuss the equally disturbing 1979 miniseries, Salem’s Lot.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 69 – Salem’s Lot (1979)

The literary juggernaut known as Stephen King had already made the book-to-movie transition with Brian De Palma’s Carrie (1976) when Warner Brothers Television decided to adapt ‘Salem’s Lot, King’s second novel, to the TV miniseries format. Horror icon Tobe Hooper was enlisted to direct as was Paul Monash to provide the screenplay adaptation of King’s novel for an all star cast that includes James Mason, David Soul, Lance Kerwin, Bonnie Bedelia, Lew Ayres, Reggie Nalder, Geoffrey Lewis, George Dzundza, Julie Cobb, Elisha Cook Jr., Marie Windsor, Fred Willard, Ed Flanders, Kenneth McMillan, and more. The result was Salem’s Lot, a now legendary, 2-part miniseries first broadcast November 1979 on CBS.

Each of this episode’s Grue Crew viewed Salem’s Lot during its premiere broadcast. Joey proclaims Salem’s Lot as one of his all time favorite horror films. Bill also loved it, but was a little put out by specific scenes present in King’s novel that are not included in the miniseries. David Soul (Starsky and Hutch, 1975-79) as the star gave Jeff some misgivings prior to seeing the film and he was annoyed at first by the changes made in the transformation of his beloved ‘Salem’s Lot (the book) into Salem’s Lot (the movie). It didn’t take long, however, for him to be won over by what was, in truth, an excellent horror film. Chad, along with Joey and Bill, in hindsight, saw definite similarities between Salem’s Lot and Fright Night (1985).

The film’s over 3-hour runtime is surprisingly even-paced and despite the length, the viewer is never caught wondering how much time is left. Scenes that have been frozen in your grue Crew’s nightmares are discussed, including, but not limited to, the floating Glick boys and Geoffrey Lewis in a rocking chair. The story is so well told, there are several unscary scenes that are memorable for their dialogue or visual impact alone. Salem’s Lot gets an enthusiastic thumbs-up from the whole Crew.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

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Misery (1990) – Episode 36 – Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond

“He didn’t get out of the cock-a-doodie car!” Annie Wilkes (Kathy Bates) won’t be taking any guff from her favorite author Paul Sheldon (James Caan) about cliffhangers. Which isn’t ideal for Paul. At the mercy of his number one fan who’s abusive and pretty much off her rocker. Paul’s in pain and needs to get out real quick. One could say his situation leaves him in… Misery. Based on the acclaimed novel from Stephen King, Misery helped legitimize the horror genre in the 90s with an Academy Award-winning performance. However, how does it hold up to this day? The answers are contained in Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 36 – Misery (1990)

Misery was based on a novel that writer Stephen King said was a metaphor for his substance abuse. Yet, the film adaptation feels more like a meditation on fandom. Kathy Bates’ Oscar-winning turn as Annie Wilkes feels like a meditation on the type of fans we see on a daily basis on the internet. After saving Paul from a blizzard, she forces him to essentially write her fan fiction. All in order to bring back Paul’s titular character from the dead. It’s a brutal case of holding a twist on the captive audience. Rather, it’s the captive writer providing a story for is captor.

To break down all of this, Thomas Mariani enlists Dave Dreher, Scott Johnson, and Kaycee Jarrard. Resident Stephen King expert Dave describes how well the novel embodied everything he imagined while reading the novel. Kaycee notes how James Caan’s performance really is one that needed to be played by a supporting actor. Scott notes just how scarily accurate this ends up being to modern fan culture. Thomas notes how this is part of the damn impressive first decade of Rob Reiner’s career. Truly, they know that Misery loves company.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Get Out (2017)

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The Shining (1980) – Episode 125 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“Great party, isn’t it?” The ghosts are all calling this party a big success. Congrats to Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) for pulling it off. Especially with his wife Wendy (Shelley Duvall) and son Danny (Danny Lloyd) constantly nagging him about “please don’t kill us.” Pfft. Family, am I right? The Shining is a pretty big example of Stephen King adaptations, one commonly derided for not being too close to the book. Did Stanley Kubrick’s lack of faithfulness stop it from being covered on the show? You’re damn right it didn’t!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 125 – The Shining (1980)

Based on the massive bestseller by Stephen King, The Shining isn’t too faithful to its source material. While the book heavily relies on knowing the madness behind Jack Torrance, Stanley Kubrick’s film is more external. It shows the madness for what it is. Presenting the irrational haunts in a rational fashion. This dichotomy is what creates the conflicts of the Torrance family as they fall apart. The Shining isn’t subtle, but the scares are just as big as Nicholson’s wails of “DANNY!” Plus, Kubrick helped revolutionized the Steadicam, creating smooth movements that revolutionized what cinema could be.

To celebrate all of this, Thomas, Doc Rotten, and Christopher G. Moore attend the Overlook Hotel’s July 4th Ball in the middle of winter. Now, some people on this crew admit they weren’t huge fans of Kubrick’s vision initially. Yet, it seems like there are a few converts to The Shining here. There’s praise all around for Kubrick’s direction, Nicholson’s performance, and the terrifying ghosts. However, there are also some crucial questions being asked. Could Chevy Chase have made a good Jack Torrance? Does Jack have “The Shine” like Danny? Wasn’t Scatman Crothers also Hong Kong Phooey? All these and more are answered, folks!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

The Blob (1988)

 

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Stephen King’s It (1990) – Episode 23 – Decades of Horror 1990s

“Oh yes… they float, Georgie. They float. And when you’re down here with me… YOU’LL FLOAT TOO!” Pennywise (Tim Curry) – also known as It – sums up his MO as he kills young Georgie. This interdimensional being is out to prey on the local children of Derry, Maine. So naturally, the only people to stop It are a group of children. Who are all connected by… fate? And defeat this being through… belief? But not until It comes back 23 years later when they’re all less interesting characters. There’s a lot to talk about here. Literally over 3 hours worth. Luckily, Decades of Horror 1990s will only take an hour to float on through your eardrums!

Decades of Horror 1990s
Episode 23 – Stephen King’s It (1990)

Following 1979’s Salem’s LotIt was the mini-series that kicked off a major trend for the era. In the fall out of this two part story, we got Tommyknockers and The Langoliers. There was nothing hotter to do back in the day then trying to cram thousands of pages into a few hours worth of time. The results are… mixed, to say the least. The children being terrorized are pretty compelling, including young turns from Ginger Snaps‘ Emily Perkins and Robot Chicken‘s Seth Green. Then their adult versions come about – played by familiar TV actors – who… aren’t as compelling. To say the least. You may be dreading any of the moments where a kid or Pennywise aren’t on the screen.

To dissect all three hours of It, Thomas brings aboard Christopher G. Moore, Dave Dreher, and Adam Thomas. The four praise Tim Curry’s iconic performance as Pennywise and are desperate to find something else that would be considered worth watching. There’s plenty to dig at, from the Stephen King cliches to the infamous ending. Of course, the optimism comes in where the upcoming It film can diverge from this adaptation. Hopefully, there’ll be fewer questions of whether Prince Albert is in a can and if he can be let out. WAH HA! WAH HA! WAH HA!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

The Sixth Sense (1999)

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Pet Sematary (1989) – Episode 115 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“Sometimes, dead is better.” Jud (Fred Gwyne) tries to warn Louis (Dale Midkiff) of the dangers of bringing back what has been buried. Will Louis heed these warnings? Can he recover from a major blow to his family? Or will he succumb to the temptations of the Pet Sematary? Take a trip down the dirt road (as pronounced RA-ODD like Jud would) and find out for yourself!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 115 – Pet Sematary (1989)

Pet Sematary is a noteworthy Stephen King adaptation. It was the first adaptation he had creative control over (not including Maximum Overdrive, which no one had control over). He demanded that director Mary Lambert and her crew stick close to his script. King was very protective of his very emotional story of family turmoil, in which Louis and Rachel Creed (Denise Crosby) move their kids Ellie (Beau and Blaze Berdahl) and Gage (Miko Hughes) to the country. They’re trying to raise their children and cat named Church. Unfortunately, a few members of that family die, leading Louis to attempt to bring them back via… a new burial.

Joining Thomas and Christopher to talk about dead kids and animals are Dave Dreher and Adam Thomas! Half have read Stephen King’s novel, the other half hasn’t. So, one side can help the other with answers. Answers to questions like: How much better would Bruce Campbell be than Dale Midkiff in the role of Louis? How much of Mike Hughes’ performance is made in editing? Does Church actually eat the entire Thanksgiving feast for cats? All these answers and more rise out of the Pet Sematary! Just don’t answer the door when the zombie questions knock at it. Unless you’re into having sex with them. But we ain’t judging.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

If you’re in the Atlanta area during Labor Day Weekend (Sept 1-4), make sure to visit us at Dragon Con Horror Track!

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Near Dark (1987) Recorded At Dragon Con!

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The Dark Half (1993) – Episode 21 – Decades of Horror 1990s

“Don’t fuck with me cock-knocker.” George Stark (Timothy Hutton) has a way with words. Much like his doppelganger Thad Beaumont (also Hutton). It’s a game of duality in The Dark Half, a film about a pseudonym brought to life. As well as addiction, paranoia, and fame. Did we mention this is based on a Stephen King book? Bet you would never have guessed. There are plenty of allusions to King’s work and time as an alcoholic writer adapted from the book. However, the question really is how the late George A. Romero adapted the material. Is it on the lighter half of that spectrum… or the darker one?

Decades of Horror 1990s
Episode 21 – The Dark Half (1993)

Dark Half is clearly very autobiographical for author Stephen King. A man known for his horror writing. Even under a pseudonym of Richard Bachmann, the man was legendary. But evidently, there’s a dark side with riding under such a name. One that rears it’s ugly head with Thad Beaumont and his alter ego George Stark clash over. Thad just wants to write to support his family without interruption. While George is a crazed lunatic out to use the killings to raise up his name. It’s a battle of wills and madness as people show up dead and Thad is a suspect because… he’s blackmailed by someone trying to reveal his pseudonym? What kind of stupid premise is this?

A premise the 90s crew are ready to go over. Joining Thomas for The Dark Half are Adam Thomas, Dave Dreher and for the first time Joey Fittos! The three discuss everything to do with The Dark Half as well as half a dozen other movies we trail off about. Adam praises George A. Romero for his competent direction. Dave and Adam have issues with how this adapts aspects of the book. Joey realizes that this isn’t a TV movie. Thomas just praises it for not being Bruiser. It’s a rather flighty discussion that at least reveals one thing: the truth of Theodor Geisel’s secret blackmail scandal!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Terminator 2: Judgement Day (1991)

 

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Christine (1983) – Episode 110 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“Whoa, whoa. You better watch what you say about my car. She’s real sensitive.” Arnie Cunningham (Keith Gordon) is rather protective of his 1957 Plymouth Fury named Christine. He worked hard to restore it, pretty much rebuilding it from the ground up. Arnie doesn’t appreciate when people mince words in front of her. Or worse, lay an unprovoked finger on her person. Then again, Arnie doesn’t need to do a thing. Christine speaks for herself. And her words are deadly.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 110 – Christine (1983)

After a prologue set in 1957 showing the deadly origins of Christine, we flash forward to our main action set in 1978. Arnie is a stock nerd archetype, to the point of cramping the new-found coolness of his best friend Dennis (John Stockwell). He’s on the football team while Arnie is playing Scrabble with his parents. After getting beaten up by the school bullies, Arnie finally catches a break when he finds Christine. While initially a junkpile, Arnie manages to restore this junked up car to its former glory. Mainly thanks to the generosity of junkyard owner Will Darnell (Robert Prosky). As Arnie spends more time restoring his new car, he slowly becomes more confident and cool. He even manages to bag the most popular girl in school Leigh (Alexandra Paul). But that confidence grows into aggressiveness, showing that the car might have an influence over Arnie. The charm works both ways, however, as the now sentient Christine is hell-bent on destroying the bullies that came between her and her man.

Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore, and Thomas Mariani have plenty to weigh on with this early Stephen King adaptation. While not the most popular film from director John Carpenter, the three praise his ability to turn a job-for-hire into an efficient horror film. There’s praise for the soundtrack selection that gives the car a personality. A few varying opinions on whether or not Keith Gordon’s transformation feels earned. Even a mutual distaste for the rather flat performance by Alexandra Paul. There are also plenty of burning questions about Christine. Does serve as a prequel to Pixar’s Cars? How did Carpenter’s team pull off those car effects shots? Would a modern-day Arnie be explicitly sexually attracted to his car? All of these are answered to the best of these three’s knowledge this episode!

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

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Carrie (1976) – Episode 42 – Decades of Horror 1970s

“They’re all going to laugh at you! They’re all going to laugh at you!” – Margaret White’s desperate pleading rings in her daughter’s mind as she is consumed with rage after she is bathed in pig’s blood at her senior prom in Brian De Palma’s horror classic CARRIE (1976). It’s the moment horror fans in the 1970s will never forget, when Carrie White wipes out most of the student body during the conclusion of the adaptation of Stephen King’s first novel. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s. Joining the grue-crew for Carrie are award winning director Christopher G. Moore and Gruesome Magazine contributor Jeff Mohr.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 42 – Carrie (1976)

 Watching CARRIE now 40 years after it debuted on theater screens across the US, the film continues to astonish, frighten, and impress with its terrific cast, its terrifying story and its fantastic direction and score. The film hits home with teen anguish of being accepted in high school, fears of the unknown, and the lasting effects of guilt and rage. Carrie stars two fantastic actresses as Carrie White and her mother Margaret, both of whom were nominated for Oscars for their roles in the film. Sissy Specek leads the film as Carrie while Piper Laurie returns from a 15 year hiatus to star as her mother. Betty Buckley stars as Carrie’s gym teacher, sensitive to Carrie’s plight. Amy Irving, Nancy Allan, and P.J. Soles are cast as her school mates who tease and torment her. William Katt is Tommy Ross who catches Carrie’s eye. And John Travolta is…well…Vinnie Barbarino. Dwerp. Brian De Palma brings every trick he knows to the film from split screens during the prom scene to Split Diopter during many important glimpses of Carrie’s position in the story to a number of camera tricks lifted directly out of Alfred Hitchcock’s cinematic arsenal. Along with the fantastic score from Pino Donaggio, Carrie is a classic that stands today just as well as it did back in 1976.

Guest host Christopher G. Moore is a self professed De Palma fan, despite his unfavorable opinion of Phantom of the Paradise, proclaiming Carrie as one of his very favorite films, horror or otherwise. Jeff Mohr chimes in with fond memories of the film, including the finale that gets the grue-crew remembering the impact and reactions of Carrie’s final moments. Together with Doc and Santos, they even wager that Carrie is the best Stephen King adaptation even though it was the very first one. But it is the performances of Sissy Specek and Piper Laurie that truly anchor the film. Carrie’s tragic character arc and Margaret’s ill-fated antagonist make the film resonate to this day. The film is iconic, frightening and relevant – a must see, a genuine horror classic.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

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Horror News Radio Episode 59 – Godzilla (2014)

Godzilla (2014) is the hottest monster film of the summer of 2014 with an epic battle between the King of the Monsters and a pair of kaiju creatures called M.U.T.O. SFX Artist Vincent Guastini (Monsters TV, Dogma, VHS 3: Viral) joins the grue-crew to take a bite out of the mammoth $93 million haul the film earned its opening weekend. Vincent with Dave and Santos at this side roars “I want more Godzilla in my Godzilla movies” as Doc and Vixen try to champion the film. It’s up to young maverick Thomas Mariani to keep things in check. Yeah, it’s trouble. The best kind!

Dave ramps up the news of the week with bits about HalloweenRob Zombie’s 31 and Stephen King’s Gerald’s Game.

Co-hosts Doc RottenSantos (The Black Saint) Ellin Jr., Dave Dreher, Thomas Mariani and Vixen are back again this week to give you the best in horror as they recap, review and obliterate all that is horror this week!  The Black Saint’s Horror Trivia Contest continues this week with the Insight Editions’ latest book Godzilla: The Art of Destruction.


Horror News Radio
The Official HorrorNews.Net Podcast

Episode 59 – Godzilla (2014) with guest host SFX Artist Vincent Guastini
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Godzilla (2014)
Years in the making from the announcement of Gareth Edwards (Monsters)  taking on the directing chores to hints of Godzilla’s design at Comic Con 2013 to this year’s incredibly effective marketing campaign, Godzilla (2014) is the ultimate example of a roller coaster ride of nervous anticipation. Will a U.S. backed studio get Godzilla right? The film is out and killing it at the box office to cheers and jeers. SFX Artist Vincent Guastini joins the regular crew to review and recap the film tackling the plot, the design of Godzilla, the other kaiju and the epic battle of San Francisco.

Horror News of the Week for 05/19/2014
Dave Dreher  shares the Horror News of the Week beginning with news of the monster sized 15 disc Blu-Ray set of Halloween series of films. Doc is excited to hear that Oculus director Mike Flanagan is pegged to direct the adaptation of the Stephen King novel, Gerald’s Game. Sean Cunningham is creatively letting bits and pieces of his plans for the Friday the 13th TV series out and about. In TV news, CBS is pimping their show Stalker and TNT is jumping into the genre business with The Shop which follows the characters introduced in Firestarter by Stephen King. Rob Zombies is beginning the marketing on his next feature called 31.

Insight Editions Book Giveaway – Godzilla: The Art of Destruction (2014)
Horror News Radio is teaming up with Insight Editions  to provide a monster book giveaway for their film Godzilla: The Art of Destruction. The book launches May 13, 2014. Entries will be accepted until Midnight (Eastern Standard Time), May 25, 2014. All you need to do is complete the The Black Saint’s HNR Horror Trivia Question at this address: http://horrornewsradio.com/trivia-godzilla. The book giveaway is open to US addresses only.

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Special thanks and a big shout out goes to the band Tear Out The Heart and Victory Records for allowing HorrorNews.Net to sample music from their single Undead Anthem for the podcast’s intro and outro theme music. Check them out and tell them The Official HorrorNews.Net Podcast sent you their way!

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