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The Others (2001) – Episode 40 – Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond

“Now children, are you sitting comfortably? Then I’ll begin… ” Grace (Nicole Kidman) has a story to share with us. This story is of The Others, in which Grace and her two children Nicholas and Anne (James Bently and Alakina Mann). Living in their giant mansion hiding from the sun. But perhaps there are more presences than meets the eye. Spooky frights are all about in Alejandro Amenábar’s The Others and Decades of Horror 1990s & Beyond is here to talk about it!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 40 – The Others (2001)

In the wake of The Sixth Sense (previously covered on the show), The Others handed us another iconic twist ending on a platter and was extremely successful as a result. Immaculate production design, gorgeous cinematography and an emotional character based story that still hooks people in to this day. This and Moulin Rouge made for a banner year for Nicole Kidman, who delivers a beautifully tragic turn that keeps you on your toes.

To discuss all of this, Thomas Mariani brings along Caitlin Turner, Adam Thomas and Sam Brutuxan! The Others brings out the emotions in all of them. Thomas admits it’s one of the few horror films to make him cry. Caitlin admires the elaborate set design. Sam’s mind is still blown by how perfectly constructed the twist is. Adam is inspired by Christopher Eccleston to make a Malekith fan page. It’s a night of inspiration and awe as these four dissect one of the best horror films of the modern era.

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

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Disney Channel Original Horror Movies Retrospective

 

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In the Mouth of Madness (1995) – Episode 39 – Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond

“Do you read Sutter Cane?” It’s the question on everyone’s lips. Well, everyone except John Trent (Sam Neill), an insurance investigator out to find the truth. Always has the upper hand on any situation, including the disappearance of mmega-successfulhorror author Sutter Cane (Jürgen Prochnow). Of course, the world of Cane has so much more to reveal to Trent. Sights that may just make his head explode into a million pieces… or just wander in an endless existence. Whatever is the will of the Elder Gods behind it all. Join us as we sink further In the Mouth of Madness for Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 39 – In the Mouth of Madness (1995)

In the Mouth of Madness was quite the departure for John Carpenter. Coming of the heels of the disastrous turn to comedy that was Memoirs of the Invisible Man, this Lovecraftian dip into unimaginable horror wasn’t quite what usually fit the image of Carpenter’s filmography. Then again, maybe it did? The mysterious terror of Halloween‘s “The Shape”, the cosmic unknown realms of Prince of Darkness and the underground society of those controlling us in They Live have Lovecraftian themes. In the Mouth of Madness just made it all the more literal with direct references to the works of HP Lovecraft and some demonic Eldrich Gods added into the mix.

To comment on all of this madness, Thomas Mariani inlists Caitlin Turner, Adam Thomas and Paul Cardullo to talk In the Mouth of Madness. It’s a Lovecraftian Lovefest as the four all praise this as one of Carpenter’s more underrated works. Paul praises the lack of what we see from the monsters. Adam considers Sam Neill’s performance to be only second to Jurassic Park. Caitlin praises the ability to adapt Lovecraft without being a direct adaptation. Thomas is just staring deep into Sutter Cane’s blue dueling pupils. Visit Caitlin’s book blog mentioned in the show here and about The Hateful Life and Spiteful Death of The Man who Was Vigo the Carpathian here.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

The Others (2001)

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Army of Darkness (1993) – Episode 38 – Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond

“Alright you primitive screwheads, listen up! You see this? This… is my BOOMSTICK!” One of many unforgettable one liners that Ash (Bruce Campbell) spouts in Army of Darkness. The third in writer/director Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead trilogy is the cult favorite. For many, it’s the first film in the franchise they saw. It gave us the most recurring pop culture variation on Ash as a character. The strapping hero with a quippy zinger and a chainsaw hand at the ready. Now, with Ash vs Evil Dead Season 3 in full swing, it’s only natural to take a look back at the film that makes many a fan scream “Hail to the King, Baby.”

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 38 – Army of Darkness (1993)

After the first Evil Dead was made for peanuts and Evil Dead II raised the production up to a modest low budget, Army of Darkness is a true studio blockbuster. Which is pretty odd considering the meager cult status of the first two. Yet, Universal and Dino De Laurentiis allowed Sam Raimi to go hog wild. And hog wild he did go. Pit demons, man eating books and an army of evil skeletons. All while having B movie sharp chin Campbell at the center. Between the surreal imagery and cartoonish slapstick, Army of Darkness is either your favorite of the trilogy or the one where it goes too far.

To debate this very topic, Thomas Mariani counts on the steel of Chad Hunt, Christopher G. Moore and Sam Brutuxan to break it down. Sam initially started with Army of Darkness and fell in love with the over the top comedy of the series. Christopher appreciated the darker roots of the original two and felt Army of Darkness went off the rails. Chad and Thomas just appreciate the weird Sam Raimi fly by the seat of your pants with the whole trilogy. The four ask the important questions about Army of Darkness. How did Ash get so buff within the span of a week in which the trilogy takes place? Does Ash vs Evil Dead carry on the legacy of the franchise well? Do skeletons have sex drives? All the answers are a click away!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

In The Mouth of Madness (1995)

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Get Out (2017) – Episode 37 – Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond

“I want your eye, man. I want those things you see through.” Jim Hudson (Stephen Root) reveals the true purpose of injecting himself into Chris Washington’s (Daniel Kaluuya) brain. Get Out was the movie of 2017. Released nearly a year ago, it managed to capture the paranoia, oppressively bleak and gradually bizarre facets the 10 months that would follow. It lasted so long in the popular consciousness that it earned writer/director Jordan Peele multiple Academy Award™ nominations. Yet, why exactly has Get Out maintained just a hold over the cultural zeitgeist? To examine this, Thomas enlists the help of a few friends who may just relate to the struggles Chris has. Luckily, they haven’t gone through the Coagula transplant… or have they?!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 37 – Get Out (2017)

Get Out is a story of simmering racial tension. Jordan Peele decided to go with not an overtly racist family of white folks as the antagonist. No, instead Chris must go up against the seemingly well-meaning if an unintentionally cringy family of his girlfriend Rose (Allison Williams). While the seemingly harmless Dean (Bradley Whitford) and Missy Armitage (Catherine Keener) are very inviting, something sinister lies beneath their smiles. Especially with the unusually chipper house staff of Georgina (Betty Gabriel) and Walter (Marcus Henderson) who make Chris raise a few eyebrows. Hopefully, he can raise his legs quick enough to Get Out before things get too crazy.

Even though Thomas just discussed Get Out on a Horror News Radio episode a little under a year ago, he just had to get a new one out. Not just because of the Oscar nominations or February being Black History Month. No, the big reason was simply this; there weren’t any black people on a Gruesome Magazine podcast discussing the film yet. So, Thomas enlists familiar voices Yonathan Habtemichael and Shakyl Lambert as well as newcomer Torrey Depina to discuss Get Out as a film that represents the Black experience. Yes, even a horror film like Get Out speaks to race relations, cultural fetishization, and systemic oppression. But don’t worry. There’s plenty of silly talk about Denzel Washington, wrestling and horror cliches to lighten the mood.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Army Of Darkness (1993)

 

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Misery (1990) – Episode 36 – Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond

“He didn’t get out of the cock-a-doodie car!” Annie Wilkes (Kathy Bates) won’t be taking any guff from her favorite author Paul Sheldon (James Caan) about cliffhangers. Which isn’t ideal for Paul. At the mercy of his number one fan who’s abusive and pretty much off her rocker. Paul’s in pain and needs to get out real quick. One could say his situation leaves him in… Misery. Based on the acclaimed novel from Stephen King, Misery helped legitimize the horror genre in the 90s with an Academy Award-winning performance. However, how does it hold up to this day? The answers are contained in Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 36 – Misery (1990)

Misery was based on a novel that writer Stephen King said was a metaphor for his substance abuse. Yet, the film adaptation feels more like a meditation on fandom. Kathy Bates’ Oscar-winning turn as Annie Wilkes feels like a meditation on the type of fans we see on a daily basis on the internet. After saving Paul from a blizzard, she forces him to essentially write her fan fiction. All in order to bring back Paul’s titular character from the dead. It’s a brutal case of holding a twist on the captive audience. Rather, it’s the captive writer providing a story for is captor.

To break down all of this, Thomas Mariani enlists Dave Dreher, Scott Johnson, and Kaycee Jarrard. Resident Stephen King expert Dave describes how well the novel embodied everything he imagined while reading the novel. Kaycee notes how James Caan’s performance really is one that needed to be played by a supporting actor. Scott notes just how scarily accurate this ends up being to modern fan culture. Thomas notes how this is part of the damn impressive first decade of Rob Reiner’s career. Truly, they know that Misery loves company.

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Get Out (2017)

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Cloverfield (2008) – Episode 34 – Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond

“I had a good day.” Beth (Odette Yustman) declares her day at the carnival with Mike (Michael Stahl-David) to be a success. Little does she know that in a few months, their lives will be forever affected by the events codenamed CloverfieldTen years later, Cloverfield remains one of the few higher budgeted found footage films out there. It’s ingenious viral marketing campaign and secrecy developed a huge amount of buzz out of so little. Just throw a mysterious trailer in front of the first Transformers movie with the date “01-18-08” and you’ll gain a profit. But how does the film hold up long after the hype? Tune in to find out!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 34 – Cloverfield (2008)

Cloverfield was wrapped in mystery at the time it came out. Promotional websites helped build the hype started by the cryptic trailer. So many theories going in. Some suspected this was a secret new Godzilla film. Others even suspected a secret Lovecraft adaptation or Voltron live action film. Yet, Cloverfield ended up being… a completely original property about a giant monster attacking New York. In found footage style, we follow a group of young folks are shown having a party that’s rudely interrupted by The Statue of Liberty’s head roaring down the street. Now, they’ve got to find some way out as the monster and the little parasite creatures that come off it attack the city.

To commemorate the 10th anniversary of Cloverfield, Thomas Mariani enlists Adam Thomas, Sam Brutuxan and Ryan Corderman to dissect the footage left behind. There’s much talk about the design of the monster, the underrated cast members and all the hype of the viral marketing. Plus, where does the monster codenamed Clover rank amongst other kaiju? Did Lily (Jessica Lucas) make it out at the end? Can the smooth vocals of Sean Kingston help us deal with the impending doom of New York? All those questions and more will be answered in this episode!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Man Bites Dog (1993)

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Dog Soldiers (2002) – Episode 33 – Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond

“I hope I give you the shits, you fucking wimp.” Spoon (Darren Morfitt) makes his last stand against the werewolves slaughtering his unit. All these soldiers have to contend with animalistic enemies of their own unit. They’re a group of Dog Soldiers as it were. Chosen by our Gruesome Magazine Patreon patrons, Dog Soldiers is one of the few highly recommended werewolf movies. Especially in recent memory. The standards of The Howling or An American Werewolf in London get a lot of love, but otherwise it’s a limited genre. Luckily, Dog Soldiers is still popular enough to get the word out there. But enough about the general public. What do the Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond crew have to say? Find out!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 33 – Dog Soldiers (2002)

Dog Soldiers follows a group of British soldiers stuck on assignment in the woods. They’re attempting a simple training mission in the woods and all seems fine. Well, until they stumble upon Captain Ryan (Liam Cunningham) severely mauled in the woods. The team stumbles into a nearby cottage in order to find shelter from the mysterious creatures that are out in the woods. From there, it’s a siege film of werewolves vs. humans.

To take a look at this tale of man vs nature, Thomas Mariani enlists Adam Thomas, Shakyl Lambert and Christopher G. Moore. They’ve all got plenty to say about Dog Soldiers. There’s praise for director Neil Marshall’s debut, mainly in how it separates itself from traditional werewolf films. Not to mention his knack for action that would serve him quite well later. Plus, all the questions you’ve been waiting for. Do werewolves perform ballet? Should werewolves go on all fours or stand upright? Was that really a Matrix reference? Listen to find out all the answers!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Cloverfield (2008)

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[Podcast] The Devil’s Backbone (2001) – Episode 31 – Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond

“A ghost is me.” Dr. Casares (Federico Luppi) finally comes to terms with what he has become. As we all must do when facing The Devil’s Backbone. Following the infamous production problems of Mimic, writer/director Guillermo Del Toro left Hollywood for a moment to collect himself. The film spawned from this – The Devil’s Backbone – is a fascinating look at isolation, loss, and destitution as a group of orphans try to fight for their lives. All while a mysterious spectre lurks in the basement. Thomas and his co-hosts are here to taste test that weird fetus juice as they dive into Del Toro in honor of his upcoming film The Shape of Water.

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 31 – The Devil’s Backbone (2001)

While considered an older sibling to Guillermo Del Toro’s big Oscar nomination heavy splash Pan’s LabyrinthThe Devil’s Backbone often feels left alone in the dust. Much like young Carlos (Fernando Tielve) is at the orphanage of Dr. Casares and his wife Carmen (Marisa Paredes). Carlos often gets picked on by the other orphans, particularly as Jaimie (Inigo Garces) picks on him. He eventually starts seeing some mysterious shapes and shadows, only to find out that this orphanage is haunted by the ghost of a young boy named Santi (Junio Valverde). Is this ghost out to kill or to protect the children?

Well, Thomas and his guests Caitlin Turner, Adam Thomas and Christopher G. Moore are here to answer such a crucial question. The Devil’s Backbone is discussed at length by these four. All of them wonder why it isn’t as well appreciated as other Del Toro films. Christopher G. Moore dishes out some intriguing trivia. Caitlin appreciates the more female gaze perspective. Adam is still frozen with tension at that door scene. Thomas just wants to know why the hell that one lady trying putting out a gas fire with a blanket. All this and more is revealed as they dive directly into The Devil’s Backbone.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)

 

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Batman Returns (1992) – Episode 30 – Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond

“I am not a human being. I am an animal!” Oswald ‘The Penguin’ Cobblepot (Danny DeVito) declares his identity pretty overtly. Batman Returns is not a subtle movie. Many would question why a superhero movie is being covered on a horror podcast. What is this, Horror News Radio? Well, 1) Batman Returns has been suggested by fans, 2) We’ve got a Justice League movie coming out and 3) there’s some pretty horrific stuff featured in there. How much? Listen to find out!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 30 – Batman Returns (1992)

Batman Returns had a lot to live up to. Being the sequel to 1989’s Batman – a game changer in terms of blockbuster filmmaking – there’s a lot of mounting pressure. Director Tim Burton returned along with The Caped Crusader, but promised something a bit different. He kept the gothic noir setting and his Batman/Bruce Wayne actor Michael Keaton but put in a lot more stuff distinctive of him. Outcast villains like The Penguin or Selina Kyle/Catwoman (Michelle Pfeiffer). A brand new shadowy corporate tycoon Max Shreck (Christopher Walken). Black and white stripes. Yup, lots and lots of that. In other words, he turned Batman Returns into more of a Tim Burton film. Something that got him the boot from the franchise due to the macabre nature of the film.

Yet, does that seem to bad in hindsight, given some of the post-Batman Returns films featuring The Dark Knight? That’s up for Thomas Mariani to decide, alongside his panel. Thomas, Chad Hunt, Jordan Worth Cobb and Adam Thomas all discuss what makes Batman Returns such a curious oddity. The campy qualities that recall the 1960s show. Some disturbing imagery that made McDonald’s cancel a Happy Meal tie in. Much like Selina Kyle and Bruce Wayne’s relationship, there’s a whole lot of duality going on. But to quote Christopher Walken, “YAWN.” Why read about it when you can listen in as you slide into your own Batcave.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

If you’re donating at least $1 to the Gruesome Magazine Patreon, you can vote for the last Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond. Just go to the poll here if you’re a patron and vote. Voting ends November 29th.

Next Episode

The Devil’s Backbone (2001)

 

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The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror Retrospective (1990-2017) – Episode 29 – Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond

“This is indeed a disturbing universe.” Maggie Simpson (James Earl Jones) gives us one of many great quotes the recite endlessly. The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror episodes are just a sliver of the legacy this titan of a show has left behind. With over 600 episodes in nearly 30 years of time, our favorite yellow-skinned cartoon family has seen a lot of things. Celebrity cameos, world-changing event & a gradual dip in quality. The works. Now, join Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond for a journey through all of the anthology Halloween episodes that have aired from 1990 all the way to the most recent 28th entry as the October haunts season concludes!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 29 – The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror Retrospective (1990 – 2017)

The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror is has been an annual staple for America’s longest-running sitcom since it’s second season. Starting off with segments that adapt Edgar Allen Poe or parody Amityville HorrorThe Simpsons certainly has changed in the intervening years. The segments have grown more gruesome, the parodies more modern and the jokes… few and far between? I know. Someone saying The Simpsons has declined in quality on the internet. Shocker! Still, Simpsons THOH episodes always have something curious about them even at their absolute worst. The animation is usually quite elaborate, turning Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, Maggie & all our favorite Springfieldians into something off-kilter and Alf Clausen’s music was always an ethereal joy.

To talk about the good, the bad and the ugly of all this, Thomas Mariani has recruited three terrifying treehouse dwellers and fellow lifelong The Simpsons fans Yonathan Habtemichael, Kaycee Jarrard and Scott Johnson. All three describe their passionate love for the classic years before groaning (and in some cases, sticking up for) the modern years that are so derided. Simpsons THOH segments of old are praised for their consistent laughs, imagination, and cultural impact. More modern stories are… given a bit less praise. Yet, there’s still some love to go around for underrated gems and for the most peculiar episode: a Halloween Simpsons episode that is an anthology with no continuity?! Well, if you asked how that happened… a wizard did it. Happy Halloween Everybody… oh, it’s November 1st? D’OH!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Batman Returns (1992)