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Burnt Offerings (1976) – Episode 76 – Decades of Horror 1970s

“Oh yes, and this house will be here long, long after you have departed. You’ll believe me.” These ominous words turn out to be all too true for the summer renters of the Allardyce house. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Bill Mulligan, Chad Hunt, and Jeff Mohr – as they take a trip for a short summer stay with the Rolf family at the Allardyce house and encounter the horrors of Burnt Offerings (1976).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 76 – Burnt Offerings (1976)

Directed and co-written by Dan Curtis of Dark Shadows, Nightstalker, and Trilogy of Terror fame, Burnt Offerings is co-written by frequent Curtis-collaborator William F. Nolan, adapted from Robert Marasco’s novel of the same title. The film begins with the Rolf family – Marian (Karen Black). Ben (Oliver Reed), their son David (Lee Montgomery), and Aunt Elizabeth (Bette Davis) – arriving at their too-good-to-be-true summer rental. The family is greeted by the property’s brother and sister owners – Roz (Eileen Heckart) and Arnold (Burgess Meredith) Allardyce – and Walker (Dub Taylor), their handyman. The Allardyces explain to the Rolfs that their only duties during their summer stay are to keep up the house and property, and to feed Mother Allardyce, who will remain locked away and unseen in an upstairs bedroom. As soon as Roz, Arnold, and Walker leave for the summer, the house begins to have a very disturbing effect on each of the Rolfs.

Given that Curtis made his reputation in television, your Grue Crew marvel at the quality of the cast of this theatrical release.  Doc, Chad, and Jeff unabashedly love Burnt Offerings! On the other hand, Bill opines that haunted house films are not his thing, but even so, admits that Burnt Offerings is a pretty good example within its sub-genre. Doc expresses his appreciation for Karen Black’s performance and we discover that Chad has been a fan of Oliver Reed’s acting ever since Hammer’s The Curse of the Werewolf (1961), despite Reed’s legendary antics. The entire Grue Crew were freaked-out by the Hearse Driver/Chauffeur (Anthony James) that appears from Ben’s (and Dan Curtis’) childhood nightmares. As the show winds down, Jeff burns the remaining time to go all fanboy on William F. Nolan to the point that no one else can give their final thoughts.

Doc also reveals a guest appearance he made on Episode 107 of The Horror Returns Podcast on which they covered three films from 1978: The Manitou, Piranha, and Martin. They also give a special shout out to the late Santos Ellin Jr. and all he has done to promote the genre we love so much. You can find The Horror Returns on iTunes or at this link: The Horror Returns

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

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Let Sleeping Corpses Lie (1974) – Episode 75 – Decades of Horror 1970s

“I wish the dead could come back to life, you bastard, so then I could kill you again!” Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Bill Mulligan, Chad Hunt, and Jeff Mohr – as they take a road trip to kick, examine, and generally disturb the sleeping corpses lying around in 1974’s Let Sleeping Corpses Lie.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 75 – Let Sleeping Corpses Lie (1974)

Directed by Jorge Grau and written by Sandro Continenza and Marcello CosciaLet the Sleeping Corpses Lie pairs Edna Simmonds (Cristina Galbó) and George Meaning (Ray Lovelock) as two “accidental” companions traveling the English countryside during an ultrasonically created zombie apocalypse. Despite the SF-based zombie justification, a little schmear of blood on the eyelids of a fresh corpse inexplicably seems to  be a catalyst for the transformation of the corpse to the living dead. A throwback police inspector (Arthur Kennedy) decides our two protagonists are drug-crazed, hippie satanists who are the cause of all the local mayhem and sets out to prove it.

Don’t be surprised if the plot sounds familiar even though you don’t recognize the title. Let Sleeping Corpses Lie is a film that never saw a title it didn’t like. Depending on when and where it was released, it was also known as The Living Dead at the Manchester Morgue, aka Don’t Open the Window, aka Breakfast at the Manchester Morgue, aka Do Not Speak Ill of the Dead, aka Zombi 3, aka No profanar el sueño de los muertos, aka Non si deve profanare il sonno dei morti, aka … well, you get the idea.

Bill Mulligan and Chad Hunt put Let Sleeping Corpses Lie in their lists of top 10 zombie films. As a first time viewer, Jeff Mohr found the mausoleum scene to be particularly horrifying while Doc Rotten points out the finale as the hospital is another key scene. Suffice it to say, the entire Grue Crew see Let Sleeping Corpses Lie as a very influential film and heartily recommend it. If you haven’t seen it, what are you waiting for?

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

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Horror-Themed Music Videos of the 1980s – Episode 135 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“Darkness falls across the land. The midnight hour is close at hand. Creatures crawl in search of blood. To terrorize y’all’s neighborhood.” Vincent Price helps make Michael Jackson’s Thriller one of the best horror-themed music videos of the 1980s along with director John Landis and special make-up effects designed and created by Rick Baker. Breaking out of our norm of covering horror films of the decades, for our special 2nd year anniversary episode we dive into the music videos that defined the Eighties, especially those with a tinge of horror to them. Join Dave Dreher, Christopher G. Moore, and Doc Rotten on this special visit back to when MTV played music videos 24×7 and some of them were as scary as they were awesome…well, in most cases…

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 135 – Horror-Themed Music Videos of the 1980s

For this episode, with the help of previous co-host and Decades of Horror co-founder Thomas Mariani, we dropped a list of 15 horror-themed music videos for the grue-believers to vote on. The top 10 of that list, we discuss on this podcast. We also present some missed classics as provided by fans of the show and some congratulations on our 2nd anniversary. Thank you all for participating and listening.

The Top 10 Horror-Themed Music Videos

  • 10 Total Eclipse of the Heart by Bonnie Tyler (2/83)
  • 09 Killer Klowns from Outer Space by the Dickies (88)
  • 08 Bark at the Moon by Ozzy Osbourne (83)
  • 07 Dancing with Myself by Billy Idol (82)
  • 06 Who Made Who by AC/DC (86)
  • 05 Pet Sematary by Ramones (89)
  • 04 He’s Back (Man Behind the Mask) by Alice Cooper (86)
  • 03 Dream Warriors by Dokken (87)
  • 02 Somebody’s Watching Me by Rockwell (84)
  • 01 Thriller by Michael Jackson (12/83)

The Ones We Missed

  • Dirk Rogers: Torture by the Jackson 5, TV Dinners by ZZ Top
  • Jane Smith: Too Much Blood by The Rolling Stones
  • Brian Davis: Lost in the Shadows by Lou Gramm from the Lost Boys soundtrack
  • John Doe: Land of Confusion by Genesis
  • Sean Henry: Rob zombie’s Dragula (Not the 80’s but it still rocks!)
  • Luis Franco: That “Somebody’s Watching Me” by Rockwell scared the shit out of me as a kid. Man,I miss the 80’s. The idea of a mini-movie to go with a song is a lost art. MTV is just not MTV anymore. There was 3 crazy sci-fi themed videos whose songs had nothing to with the video; Billy Ocean’s “Loverboy” KC & The Sunshine Band’s “Give It Up, Duran Duran’s “The Wildboys“.Worth watching if you’ve never seen any of them.
  • Jerry Chandler: My Name is Norman Bates (1981) by Landscape; Pet Shop Boys: Heart (1988) if just for the sheer WTF of seeing Ian McKellen as a vampire lip syncing Pet Shop Boys; Metallica’s One (1989) that’s a whole different kind of horror.
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The Birds (1963) – Episode 32 – Decades of Horror: The Classic Era

“I have never known birds of different species to flock together. The very concept is unimaginable. Why, if that happened, we wouldn’t stand a chance! How could we possibly hope to fight them?”  Yikes! The ornithologist has a darn good point! Join Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry (He’s ba-a-a-ck!), and Jeff Mohr, along with guest host Dan Sellers, as we take a bird’s eye view of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds (1963).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 32 – The Birds (1963)

Based on Daphne du Maurier’s short story of the same title and adapted to the screen by Evan Hunter, The Birds tells the story of Bodega Bay, a California coastal town terrorized by inexplicably aggressive and belligerent birds.The film stars Tippi Hedren (Melanie), Suzanne Pleshette (Annie), Jessica Tandy (Lydia), Veronica Cartwright (Cathy), and Rod Taylor (Mitch) under the direction of Alfred Hitchcock.

The stars are surrounded by a cast populated with some of the best character actors in the business, including Ethel Griffies as the ornithologist, Charles McGraw as the fishing boat captain, Lonny Chapman as the innkeeper, Doreen Lang as the hysterical mother, Karl Swenson as the drunken prophet, Joe Mantell as the cynical businessman, Ruth McDevitt as the owner of bird shop, Malcolm Atterbury as the deputy, Richard Deacon as Mitch’s neighbor in San Francisco, Doodles Weaver as a fisherman helping with a rental boat, and William Quinn as a man in the diner. You might not recognize all of their names, but if you watched many movies or television shows from the 1950s through the 1970s, you will most assuredly recognize their faces.

Jeff points out The Birds has been called Hitchcock’s monster movie. Chad proclaims his love of Albert Whitlock’s matte paintings and explains the method used by longtime Disney employee Ub Iwerks in providing the special effects for The Birds. Joseph marvels at Hitchcock’s ability to build and hold tension and suspense, and they all agree the credit should be shared with editor George Tomasini. Dan discusses the prototypical “Hitchcock blonde” and confides to the Grue Crew that he’s just glad to be doing a podcast without Sammie Cassell.

We plan to release a new episode every other week. The next episode in our very flexible schedule is John Frankenheimer’s Seconds (1963), selected by Jeff Mohr.

Please let us know what you think of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era and what films you’d like to hear us cover! We want to hear from you! After all, without you, we’re just four nutjobs talking about the films we love. Send us an email or leave us a message, a review, or a comment at GruesomeMagazine.com, iTunes, Stitcher, the Horror News Radio App, or the Horror News Radio Facebook group.

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you for listening!

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Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988) – Episode 134 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“There’s a legend ’round here. A killer buried, but not dead. A curse on Crystal Lake, a death curse: Jason Voorhees’ curse.” Our narrator (Walt “Crazy Ralph” Gorney) details the legend of Jason Voorhees. After being stuck at the bottom of Camp Crystal Lake in the last film, Jason is awoken by a young lady named Tina (Lar Park Lincoln) with psychic abilities. It’s essentially Carrie vs. Jason… at least that’s the intent. So is this a slashing entry in the franchise or is Pamela going to warn her son that “They’re All Gonna Laugh at You?” Listen to find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 134 – Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)

Released in 1988, Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood came out near the end of the slasher genre’s reign. It was a time when the MPAA became more critical of violence, causing the iconic kills the franchise was known for to be cut down severely. Director John Carl Buechler has been publically against how this turned out and we’ve only seen daily footage of the kills. Some of them were pretty gruesome, but alas not to be. Which makes some of the teen stuff all the more of a slog to get through.

Luckily, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore, and Thomas Mariani are here to take a closer look at Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood. All of them appreciate the final fight with Tina and the ambition of having a superpowered heroine fight Jason. Especially when that Jason is played for the first time by iconic stuntman Kane Hodder. Yet, there’s plenty of issues to have with the editing and lack originality amongst the supporting cast. All this and more is discussed on Decades of Horror 1980s!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Remember to vote in our two year anniversary poll about The Top 10 Best 80s Horror Music Videos!

Next Episode

Top 10 Best 80s Horror Themed Music Videos!

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Jaws 3-D (1983) – Special Edition – Decades of Horror 1980s

“The Third Dimension is TERROR” The tagline for Jaws 3-D works hard to convince its audience that the film is full of chills and thrills. Buried in the Eighties coming-at-you 3-D effects is a butchered story about the Brody boys all grown up and facing a great white shark of their own…at a famous sea park, no less. Dennis Quaid and Bess Armstrong lead the cast while first-time (and only-time) director Joe Alves lobs fish, arms, and shark teeth into the audience’s lap. Seen in 3-D for this episode, Thomas, Doc, and Christopher are joined by Paul Cardullo to relish in the wacky 1983 cinematic fad.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Special Edition – Jaws 3-D (1983)

Jaws 3-D credits the legendary Richard Matheson as its screenwriter. The resulting film, however, does not feel like any other example of Matheson’s work. He has gone on record stating his original script was “bedeviled by script-doctors.”  Along with Quaid and Armstrong, the cast includes Leah Thompson, Simon MacCorkindale, and Louis Gosset Jr. while the film includes two sharks, the classic “Bruce” great white is nowhere to be seen. Yes, despite its flaws, the film is stupid fun in its original 3-D form and was a success in its time holding the record for highest gross for a 3-D film until Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over in 2003

Guest host Paul Cardullo joined Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to catch Jaws 3-D presented in 3D at the FantasticRealm Film Series at The Carolina Theater in Durham, North Carolina while Thomas is confined to the standard “flat” edition. Thomas has yet to forgive Doc for this… In addition to Jaws 3-D, the Grue-Crew discuss the other four 3-D films featured during the series: Starchaser: The Legend of Orin (1985), Metalstorm: The Destruction of Jared-Syn (1983), Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone (1983), Treasure of the Four Crowns (1983). Doc Rotten also had the opportunity to interview Jim Carl, the director of the film series about 3D films, who reveals what The Carolina has in store for horror fans and Harry Guerro, from Exhumed Films, discusses 3-D films, his collection of cinema history, and some of the most rare 3-D films in existence.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Remember to vote in our two year anniversary poll about The Top 10 Best 80s Horror Music Videos!

Next Episode

Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)

 

 

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The Gate (1987) – Episode 133 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“Demons aren’t gonna ring the doorbell!” Terry (Louis Tripp) gives his buddy Glen (Stephen Dorff) a lesson in demon etiquette. Yes, the cult favorite gateway horror film The Gate is much beloved by horror fans of the 1980s. So much so that it won our Patreon Decades of Horror Poll for the month of April! Yes, those who at least pay $1 a month got to choose this episode’s topic of The Gate. So grab a shovel and your favorite subliminal death metal albums as we try to squash out some demons before they disrupt our 80s house party!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 133 – The Gate (1987)

The Gate is a relatively simple story. Young Glen and his older sister Al (Christa Denton) have the house to themselves for the weekend while their parents are out. So, while Al is having her friends over for a big party, Glen and his friend Terry are dealing with a mysterious geode they found in the sinkhole in the backyard. That geode manages to scrawl some incantation on a notepad that the kids read, unleashing demons upon their suburban house. Corpses from walls, dads with melting faces and moms-turned-to-dogs ensue from there.

To dissect this horror film for all ages, kids at heart Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani exhume what’s in the hole for The Gate. While all three originally saw this well out of the target demographic, this trio appreciates many things about this gateway horror film. Christopher loves the subtle bits of filmmaking craft. Doc learns to appreciate the believable child performances. Thomas wonders if Stephen Dorff peaked to early. It’s just too metal a podcast to handle. Better drape yourself in a sheet and lip sync to some demonic songs before the little demons bite your leg!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Remember to vote in our two year anniversary poll about The Top 10 Best 80s Horror Music Videos!

Next Episode

Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)
Plus, our Jaws 3D (1983) Bonus Episode!

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Beetlejuice (1988) – Episode 132 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“It’s Showtime!” Beetlejuice (Michael Keaton) gets his show on the road. So why not listen as The Grue Crew does the same?! Celebrating its 30th anniversary this month, Beetlejuice was the film that launched Tim Burton’s career. A horror comedy covered in spirals, normalcy satire and gothic pondering that made Burton the most mainstream recognized auteur of the modern era. However, does Beetlejuice make us Shake Senora or does it deserved to be gobbled up by a sandworm? Tune in and find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 132 – Beetlejuice (1988)

Beetlejuice is an odd choice for a titular character, given he’s only in about 17 minutes of the final film. Then again, Keaton’s a pop culture creep with a disgusting charm who makes a huge impression for the limited time. Yet, our protagonists are the newly deceased couple of Adam (Alec Baldwin) and Martha Maitland (Geena Davis) who are stuck in their home and can’t stop it from being sold to new owners. Those new owners are The Deetzes, including the goth daughter Lydia (Winona Ryder) who can see them.. The Maitlands need to get these folks out of their eternal resting place, so they utilize the world of the dead’s rules to their advantage and get the titular ghoul to help out. Betrayal, stop motion and Harry Belafonte ensue from there.

Thomas, Doc Rotten, and Christopher G. Moore crack open their copies of The Handbook for the Recently Deceased to decipher Beetlejuice. Doc admits having fallen back in love with this after some Tim Burton overexposure. Christopher G. Moore revels in his love for all things striped and goth. Thomas just loves how the character and world building meld so well. There’s appreciation for everything from the production design to the diverse musical soundtrack to Dick Cavett’s underrated acting ability. Plus they all agree that “…IT KEEPS GETTIN’ FUNNIER, EVERY TIME THEY SEE IT!”

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

The Gate (1987), Our Patreon Poll Winner!

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Night of the Creeps (1986) – Episode 131 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“What is this? A homicide, or a bad B-movie?” Detective Ray Cameron (Tom Atkins) asks a trick question with an obvious answer. It’s both. Then again, Night of the Creeps isn’t really bad by any stretch. A sci-fi horror comedy for the ages, Night of the Creeps tells a simple story. One of college love, space slugs, and zombies from the grave. Haven’t we gotten enough of those, guys? Well, writer/director Fred Dekker at least manages to inject some B-movie fan charm in the proceedings in ways that anyone can get behind. The good news is Night of the Creeps is here on Decades of Horror 1980s. The bad news is… nothing, actually. Hooray!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 131 – Night of the Creeps (1986)

Night of the Creeps is the story of two college freshman who – in order to impress a fraternity – awaken a long frozen zombie and unleash chaos on a sleepy college town. Only depressed drunken Detective Cameron (Tom Atkins) can save the day while facing against demons of his past. While Night of the Creeps didn’t make a big splash in theaters back in the summer of 1986, it managed to become a cult favorite on video. Not a surprise, given it’s a mash of sci-fi aliens, ax-murdering killers and Tom Atkins dishing out one-liners. A rollicking good time that goes from space to 50s Americana to the nightmarish world of mid-80s college sex romp. It’s got everything and the kitchen sink… Dick Miller! There’s plenty of terror, romance and “thrill me”s to go around.

To dissect all the remaining gory bits of mayhem, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani are here and hopefully, the space slugs won’t get them first! Marvel as Christopher admits the influence Night of the Creeps had on one of his short films. Shudder as Doc realizes he hasn’t seen the Director’s Cut ending that crept up on him upon this watch. Ponder with Thomas at the possibility of a Tom Atkins detective story comeback movie. Plus, plenty of discussions about Fred Dekker’s love of the genre, distinguishing between Kevin Pollack & David Paymer and making a drinking game out of all the director name tributes. Of course, we don’t condone irresponsible drinking. You’ll be dead within the first 20 minutes. Or at least screaming like banshees! Heh heh… “screaming like banshees.”

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Beetlejuice (1988)

 

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The Evil Dead (1981) – Episode 130 – Decades of Horror 1980s

“You bastards. Why are you torturing me like this? WHY?!” Ash Williams (Bruce Campbell) ponders this aloud to the Deadites torturing them. Or maybe this question is more directed toward writer/director Sam Raimi hauling abuse at Bruce. Either way, The Evil Dead is definitely a punishing film, both toward its cast and the audience. Every time someone gets stabbed in the ankle or thrown into a bookshelf, both the actor and the audience feels it. Raimi started his illustrious career with this independent horror flick and it sure did shape where he’d go from here. There’s gore, mayhem and low budget craziness abound. Might as well… JOIN US for it!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 130– The Evil Dead (1981)

The Evil Dead is sort of a black sheep in the franchise from a modern perspective. While Evil Dead II and Army of Darkness resemble more of what fans love about the franchise, The Evil Dead is a straight-up horror film with little comedy to be found. Basically, the foundation from which the surreal comedy would spring forth.  That doesn’t mean it’s without merit. By no means. Sam Raimi even this early has so many dynamic camera moves that would later revolutionize blockbusters with Spider-Man. Helps that Bruce Campbell gets the crap beat out of him.

To talk all things The Evil Dead, Christopher G. Moore, Doc Rotten and Thomas Mariani are joined by Adam Thomas. Thomas discusses the evolution of the franchise. Christopher elaborates on how big an influence Sam Raimi had on his young filmmaker mind. Doc talks about how much it created the cabin in the woods genre. Adam winces while describing how brutal Campbell’s painful moments are. Listen to find out all the details!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Night of the Creeps (1986)