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Saw Retrospective (2004-2010) – Episode 27 – Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond

“Let the game begin.” Jigsaw aka John Kramer (Tobin Bell) is the master of ceremonies of his morality inspired death traps. Given it was the franchise that started the torture porn movement, Saw is often maligned as a lesser example of mainstream horror. The fetishistic emphasis on death and soap opera antics only go so far, especially for a franchise with seven installments. Yet, there’s somehow a new entry coming to theaters. So what better way to celebrate than by looking back at the first seven entries? Listen or not, make your choice. But seriously… please listen.

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 27 – Saw Retrospective (2004 – 2010)

Saw is an indie marvel. Made for a mere $1 million, the film grossed over 100 times that much. It tapped into an uncertain zeitgeist of troubling times. America was just starting the Iraq War. Torture was a common thread in news. Our world was still in the throes of confusion and distrust from 9/11. A world that sought escape in the form of a madman designing traps to test people’s moral gumption. Saw continued this trend throughout the 2000s, each installment introducing new bits of continuity and trying to top one another with gory traps. The franchise started off the careers of modern horror masters like James Wan, Leigh Whannell, Darren Lynn Bousman and Marcus Dunstan. Saw was really the only mainstream horror franchise in theaters for half a decade… until it wasn’t.

To dissect where everything went wrong, Thomas Mariani brings in a few familiar voices. Adam Thomas, Shakyl Lambert and Ryan Corderman are in for the long haul as all four hosts discuss all seven Saw films in this extended episode. The quartet examines each film in gruesome detail, praising consistent qualities like Tobin Bell while damning the soap opera continuity that gets tedious. There’s praise thrown around for a few of the earlier entries and even a bit of love that trickles down into the latter parts of the series. But there’s plenty of baffling elements of Saw for our heroes to question. How did Jigsaw get more elaborate traps put together? Why did we need to know more through endless flashbacks? Who thought Costas Mandylor was a good idea? All this and more tear the group apart as they try to understand what made people see Saw time and time again.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Cabin in the Woods (2012)

 

 

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Deathdream (1974) – Episode 60 – Decades of Horror 1970s

“Something unspeakable has come home.” Not only is it unspeakable, but it has already died once. Doc Rotten is still on hiatus, diligently working on the next issues of the Gruesome Magazine quarterly print and electronic editions. In the interim, your regular host, Jeff Mohr, is joined by the capable and knowledgeable Bill Mulligan, film director, and Chad Hunt, comic book artist/writer and co-host of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast. Join them as they follow the members of a family wracked by the effects of the Vietnam War in Deathdream.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 60 – Deathdream (1974)

The second of director Bob Clark’s three horror films, Deathdream (aka Dead of Night) is sandwiched neatly between Children Shouldn’t Play with Dead Things (Decades of Horror 1970s – Episode 12) and Black Christmas (Decades of Horror 1970s – Episode 34). Written by Alan Ormsby, the film tells the story of Andy (Richard Backus), a Vietnam War veteran who is killed-in-action and yet returns home the same day his family gets the news of his death. Though the death notice is not a mistake,  Andy’s parents (John Marley and Lynn Carlin) and sister (Anya Ormsby) assume it is, and celebrate his homecoming. As his physical condition deteriorates and his behavior gets more and more bizarre, Andy’s father brings the local doctor (Henderson Forsythe) home to take a look at his son. As the film progresses, Andy’s decay increases and the body count rises.

The foundation of Deathdream’s story is planted firmly in W. W. Jacobs’ 1902 short story, “The Monkey’s Paw.” In other words, be careful what you wish for! The story might also be seen as an allegory delving into the additional trauma experienced by returning Vietnam War veterans, stigmatized by society and struggling with PTSD, and the effect that trauma has on their family and friends.

Tom Savini partners with Alan Ormsby to provide the film’s effective, low budget makeup effects. Andy’s progressive decay is successfully depicted as he moves from seemingly normal to a rapidly decaying corpse. Deathdream is not a fun watch.This episode’s Grue Crew give the film a unanimous thumbs up with the following caveat: The filmmakers successfully tell a very depressing story. Deathdream is not a fun watch.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

 

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Santo and Blue Demon Against the Monsters (1969-70) – Episode 19 – Decades of Horror: The Classic Era

“The day I died, I swore I would get my revenge!” Join the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era crew for this episode – Erin Miskell, Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, Jeff Mohr, and special guest Mike Imboden – as we wrestle with Santo and Blue Demon Against the Monsters in honor of El Santo’s 100th birthday on September 23, 2017.

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 19 – Santo and Blue Demon Against the Monsters (1969-70)

Directed by Gilberto Martínez Solares and written by  Rafael García Travesi, Santo and Blue Demon Against the Monsters tells an age-old tale. An evil doctor rises from the dead and directs the efforts of as many monsters as he can resurrect to combat the heroes. More specifically, Dr. Bruno Halder (Carlos Ancira), who hates Santo, his brother Otto Halder (Ivan J. Rado), and his niece Gloria (Hedi Blue), is resurrected from the dead by his diminutive hunchback assistant Waldo (Santanón). With the aid of his zombie henchmen in green greasepaint, Bruno gathers together some of the world’s most famous monsters and plans to murder his foes . . . and worse. He even makes a duplicate Blue Demon do his evil bidding. Thankfully Santo is here to protect his fiancee, her father, and the world!

Exactly what does the, “Against the Monsters” of Santo and Blue Demon Against the Monsters refer to? The complete cast of resurrected monstruos includes El Vampiro, La Mujer Vampiro, Franquestein, La Momia, El Hombre Lobo, El Ciclope, and the creature Joseph Perry refers to as “Tiki-brain Guy.” That’s surely enough to take care of Santo and Blue Demon, right? Not on your life! Not if you know the full legend of El Santo!

If you’re paying attention, you’ll find out which of this episode’s Grue Crew made each of these statements:

  • “… I got to actually touch our fellow co-ghost.” … “Let me show you on the doll where exactly it happened.”
  • “It’s cheesy. It’s just a big piece of chunky, stinky Limburger cheese, but I love it.”
  • “This thing is a thing of beauty. Just shut up and take my money.”
  • “Even during the makeout sessions, everybody leaves the masks on!”
  • “I’m wearing my Luchador mask right now, actually.”
  • “Let me cheer things up with my favorite monster who I call the Tiki-brain Guy.”

We plan to release a new episode every other week. In timing with Halloween, our next episode in our very flexible schedule, in honor of Halloween, is Dracula (1931), hosted by Jeff.

Please let us know what you think of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era and what films you’d like to hear us cover! We want to hear from you! After all, without you, we’re just four nutjobs talking about the films we love. Send us an email  (chadhunt@gruesomemagazine.com, erinmiskell@gruesomemagazine.com, jeffmohr@gruesomemagazine.com, or josephperry@gruesomemagazine.com) or leave us a message, a review, or a comment at GruesomeMagazine.com, iTunes, Stitcher, the Horror News Radio App, or the Horror News Radio Facebook group.

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you for listening!

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Black Swan (2010) – Episode 26 – Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond

“I felt it. Perfect. It was perfect.” Nina (Natalie Portman) realizes her full potential as she performs Swan Lake. But at what cost? The sacrifice of an artist can often be horrific. A true nightmare to need to live up to your craft. Yet, it’s something true artists do on a regular basis. Even if it means losing their sanity, their friends and their own sense of identity. All things Nina is slowly lost in Black Swan. Can Thomas and his own troupe of podcasts keep themselves together? Or will they sink into madness along with Nina? Find out as Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond steps further into the modern age for the October haunts season!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 26 – Black Swan (2010)

Black Swan was released in December of 2010 to massive critical raves. Fresh off a triumphant critical sweep with The Wrestler, Darren Aronofsky took his first full step into the horror genre and got plenty of Oscar buzz for it. Rare for the genre, but not out of bounds for Aronofsky. Afterall, how horrific is the drug themed drama of Requiem for a Dream? Yet, Black Swan is much more firmly planted in the genre, even it it’s within a more grounded prism. After all, Nina is losing her sense of identity and seeing herself as a mutation of beauty. An artist sacrificing her humanity to become the swan she was born to be. Whether it be at the hands of her mother (Barbara Hershey), her teacher (Vincent Cassel) or her competition (Mila Kunis), Nina is losing what it means to be a “little princess.” Will she end up a has been like Beth (Winona Ryder) or will she transform into a fierce formidable foe that swims along the lake for another night?

To answer all of those questions, Thomas has returning guests Adam Thomas and Yonathan Habtemichael to help out. Some praise Aronofsky’s craft. Others love the performances. But not everyone is on the Black Swan train. There’s so much to unravel. Does Black Swan fit into the genre? Was the Academy love warranted? Does Nina survive the ending? So many interpretations, but only one way to find out! Give us a listen. Don’t fall into the orchestra pit to never be seen again!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Saw Retrospective (2004 – 2010)

 

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Ginger Snaps (2000) – Episode 25 – Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond!

“A girl can only be a slut, a bitch, a tease, or the virgin next door.” Ginger (Katherine Isabelle) unveils the societal norms ladies are stuck with. It’s something covered extensively in Ginger Snaps, where the lines between high school gender dynamics and werewolf carnage are thin. Both are an important step in life, one that mirrors our own step Beyond with this episode. Well, except for the copious amounts of blood in either context. Anyway, it’s time to ring in the October haunts lineup of new millennium chills!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 25 – Ginger Snaps (2000)

Ginger and her sister Bridgette (Emily Perkins) are burgeoning young women. After a delay in puberty, they’re finally beginning to blossom. Both are taking it pretty hard. The boys at school either leer or make fun. Their mother (Mimi Rogers) keeps expecting them to shed their goth exteriors. Dead dogs start showing up mauled to death. All the stuff health class videoes told us about. Ginger Snaps is a rare breed of werewolf film. It’s one of the few good ones and it uses a relatable theme of adolescence to make the transformation mean something. Ginger’s turns scare her sister, making her wonder whether a tender hug will result in a throat ripping. It’s an early example of the great horror we’d be getting in the new millennium.

Well, that’s what most of us think at least. Joining Thomas Mariani to dive into this new age are a familiar voice and a new one. Returning guest Caitlin Turner gives an honest female perspective on Ginger Snaps while new voice Shadow… has a different take. Recorded live in their hotel room while attending Dragon Con, this trio has a lot to say about growth, development, and werewolves.  Ginger Snaps takes the show into interesting directions. Plenty of thoughts about development, male to female relationships and what those hairs on our back are for. It’s as educational as it is terrifying. Welcome to womanhood, indeed.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Black Swan (2010)

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The Uninvited (1944) – Episode 18 – Decades of Horror: The Classic Era

“They call them the haunted shores, these stretches of Devonshire and Cornwall and Ireland which rear up against the westward ocean. Mists gather here… and sea fog… and eerie stories…’’ Oooo, that’s some pretty scary stuff! (Channeling a little Second City TV) Join the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era crew – Erin Miskell, Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr – as we journey to the haunted shores and brave the classic ghost story, The Uninvited (1944).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 18 – The Uninvited (1944)

The Uninvited is based on Uneasy Freehold, a novel by Dorothy Macardle, and adapted for the screen by Frank Partos and Dodie Smith. It is considered to be the first real ghost story that isn’t predominantly a comedy and includes genuine supernatural elements.

The story follows Pamela Fitzgerald (Ruth Hussey) and her brother Roderick (Ray Milland) as they fall in love with and purchase a house on the haunted shore. It doesn’t take long for strange sounds and manifestations to spook the siblings. They try getting answers from the house’s previous owner Commander Beech (Donald Crisp) and his granddaughter Stella Meredith (Gail Russell) but to no avail.They are then introduced to the enigmatic Miss Holloway (Cornelia Otis Skinner) who only creates more questions without providing any answers. They soon band with the local doctor (Alan Napier) and the three strive to solve the mystery of the house’s haunting. The main cast receives marvelous support from Barbara Everest as Lizzie Flynn, the domestic help; and Dorothy Stickney as Miss Bird, an eccentric resident of an insane asylum.

The film benefits from not only a stellar cast and source material but an equally stellar crew. Director Lewis Allen’s first feature, The Uninvited sports a crew that includes Oscar and other award winners such as Charles Lang (cinematographer), Victor Young (music), Hans Dreier and Ernst Fegté (art directors), Edith Head (costume designer), and Farciot Edouart and Gordon Jennings (visual effects).

If you’re paying attention, you’ll find out which of this episode’s Grue Crew mad each of these statements:

  • “(She) was the kind of dame that didn’t like film noir.”
  • “It’s like the old Ed Sullivan Show with the plate spinner …”
  • “She’s got the big neon sign.”
  • “Viva la Lucha Libre!”

We plan to release a new episode every other week. The next episode in our very flexible schedule is Santo and Blue Demon Against the Monsters (1969-70), hosted by Joseph Perry.

Please let us know what you think of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era and what films you’d like to hear us cover! We want to hear from you! After all, without you, we’re just four nutjobs talking about the films we love. Send us an email  (chadhunt@gruesomemagazine.com, erinmiskell@gruesomemagazine.com, jeffmohr@gruesomemagazine.com, or josephperry@gruesomemagazine.com) or leave us a message, a review, or a comment at GruesomeMagazine.com, iTunes, Stitcher, the Horror News Radio App, or the Horror News Radio Facebook group.

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you for listening!


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The Sixth Sense (1999) – Episode 24 – Decades of Horror 1990s

“I see dead people.” – Cole (Haley Joel Osment) reveals his secret to Dr. Malcolm (Bruce Willis) in the line that launched a thousand pop culture references. M. Night Shyamalan’s The Sixth Sense was a phenomenon upon release in August of 1999. It made M. Night the new talk of Hollywood, being nominated for multiple Oscars and giving the twist ending a whole new revitalized image. However, as M. Night’s career has gone through a real roller coaster experience over the past near 20 years, one wonders how well this film holds up. Luckily, Decades of Horror 1990s is here to investigate if The Sixth Sense still packs a punch or if there’s a twist in its legacy.

Decades of Horror 1990s
Episode 24 – The Sixth Sense (1999)

Th Sixth Sense is mainly remembered for the influential twist. Obviously, it took the world by storm and has been parodied countless times. Yet, there’s more going on here. The central theme of lacking communication plagues all our characters. Malcolm’s wife Anna (Olivia Williams) is distant from him. Cole has to struggle with hiding his secret from his overworked mother Lynn (Toni Collette). Even the ghosts are unable to properly communicate with anyone other than Cole, who is at the short end of their confused and sometimes violent outbursts that scare the hell out of them. It’s a subtle yet beautiful examination of regret, loss, and connection that resonates between these characters, proving that horror can make us cry genuine tears of sadness in between fits of terror.

Well, at least for some of us. For this episode, Thomas Mariani enlists the help of a few others who can communicate with the undead, Doc Rotten and Caitlin Turner. Our trio harmoniously agrees that drama at the heart of The Sixth Sense is still palpable. Praise is spread for the entire cast, though Toni Collette gets the lion’s share of the praise for grounding Haley Joel Osment from becoming a full-blown M. Night parody of a character we’re used to. However, there’s plenty of debate as to whether the ghosts are malicious and how much the film leans on the twist to support its storytelling. It’s a…  “spirited” discussion to say the least. Plus, there’s a big announcement about a major change in the podcast to stay tuned for!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

A Big Change! Listen to Find Out!

 

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Night of the Lepus (1972) – Episode 59 – Decades of Horror 1970s

“Rabbits aren’t your bag, Roy.” It’s pretty safe to say rabbits aren’t anyone’s bag in Night of the Lepus, especially the pseudo-savage, overgrown, mutant versions in this film. The Black Saint was unable to join us for this episode and Doc Rotten is still on hiatus, diligently working on the next issues of the Gruesome Magazine quarterly print and electronic editions. Sometimes, you just can’t do everything you want to do, can you, guys? In the interim, your regular host, Jeff Mohr, is joined by the capable and knowledgeable Bill Mulligan, film director, and Chad Hunt, comic book artist/writer and co-host of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast. Join them as they weave their way through the killer rabbits of Night of the Lepus.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 59 – Night of the Lepus (1972)

Night of the Lepus is director William F. Claxton’s only entry in the horror film. Most of his experience is in the western genre, so it’s no surprise that most of the cast are frequent performers in westerns. Highly recognizable leads and supporting cast are played by Janet Leigh, Rory Calhoun, Stuart Whitman, DeForest Kelley, and Paul Fix, who all give it the old college try, but they don’t have much with which to work.

The screenplay is written by Don Holliday and Gene R. Kearney and is based on The Year of the Angry Rabbit (1964), an Australian, comic/horror/science fiction novel by Russell Braddon. Though the plot is outrageous, the novel is appreciated for its comic shadings. In Night of the Lepus, however, the filmmakers forsake any attempt at humor and go straight for outright horror, a fatal mistake. Unfortunately, no matter how ominous the script or intense the acting, the special effects are not up to the task of inciting horror from domestic rabbits performing on miniature sets.

Despite its flaws, Night of the Lepus still holds a special place in the hearts of the members of your faithful Grue Crew. Jeff Mohr has on an ongoing bromance with Rory Calhoun. Though he agrees it is a terrible film, Bill Mulligan professes a love for many of the images in Night of the Lepus and uses them in his party videos. Now there’s a party we’d love to attend! Chad Hunt, well, Chad Hunt can’t figure out why, but when he’s channel surfing and runs across Night of the Lepus, he can’t keep from pausing to watch the proverbial trainwreck.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

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House on Haunted Hill (1959) – Episode 17 – Decades of Horror: The Classic Era

“Whatever got her wasn’t human.” That is not what you want to hear while locked overnight in a haunted house. Join the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era crew – Erin Miskell, Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr – as we brave an overnight in the House on Haunted Hill (1959). William Castle, Robb White, and Vincent Price? What’s not to like.

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 17 – House on Haunted Hill (1959)

Directed by legendary gimmick-meister William Castle, House on Haunted Hill is a standard story about folks challenged to stay the night in a haunted house, but with a few twists provided by writer Robb White. Millionaire Frederick Loren (Vincent Price) carefully chooses five guests for his invitation only event — Lance Schroeder (Richard Long), Nora Manning (Carolyn Craig), Dr. David Trent (Alan Marshal), Ruth Bridgers (Julie Mitchum), and Watson Prichard (Elisha Cook Jr.) — and offers them each $10,000 if they survive the night. Also in attendance are Frederick’s wife Annabelle (Carol Ohmart), caretaker Jonas Slydes (Howard Hoffman), and his wife (Leona Anderson).

House on Haunted Hill is great fun and has some legitimate scares, but don’t spend too much time thinking about the plot. If you do, you might become obsessed with its holes and miss all the fun. The music by Von Dexter is suitably chill-inducing and is as good at setting the atmosphere as it is at setting the standard for horror films of its period.

Chad Hunt recounts his experience watching this in a theater that tried to duplicate Castle’s gimmick for this picture, which he called “Emergo.” Erin Miskell’s first memories of watching House on Haunted Hill are during a sleepover as a 10-year-old. Imagine the shrieks!

House on Haunted Hill treats its guests to the usual haunted house fare, including floating apparitions, mysteriously slamming doors, a hanging body, an unattached head, secret passages, a seriously scary old woman, an animated skeleton, blood dripping from the ceiling, and a conveniently placed vat of acid in the basement.

We also send out a hearty handclasp to our steadfast listener, saltyessentials for calling Decades of Horror: The Classic Era a podcast “you can’t do without.” Check out salty’s blog, which he calls Dead Man’s Brain or, what I watched last night.

We plan to release a new episode every other week. The next episode in our very flexible schedule is The Univited (1944), hosted by Chad Hunt.

Please let us know what you think of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era and what films you’d like to hear us cover! We want to hear from you! After all, without you, we’re just four nutjobs talking about the films we love. Send us an email  (chadhunt@gruesomemagazine.com, erinmiskell@gruesomemagazine.com, jeffmohr@gruesomemagazine.com, or josephperry@gruesomemagazine.com) or leave us a message, a review, or a comment at GruesomeMagazine.com, iTunes, Stitcher, the Horror News Radio App, or the Horror News Radio Facebook group.

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you for listening!


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Stephen King’s It (1990) – Episode 23 – Decades of Horror 1990s

“Oh yes… they float, Georgie. They float. And when you’re down here with me… YOU’LL FLOAT TOO!” Pennywise (Tim Curry) – also known as It – sums up his MO as he kills young Georgie. This interdimensional being is out to prey on the local children of Derry, Maine. So naturally, the only people to stop It are a group of children. Who are all connected by… fate? And defeat this being through… belief? But not until It comes back 23 years later when they’re all less interesting characters. There’s a lot to talk about here. Literally over 3 hours worth. Luckily, Decades of Horror 1990s will only take an hour to float on through your eardrums!

Decades of Horror 1990s
Episode 23 – Stephen King’s It (1990)

Following 1979’s Salem’s LotIt was the mini-series that kicked off a major trend for the era. In the fall out of this two part story, we got Tommyknockers and The Langoliers. There was nothing hotter to do back in the day then trying to cram thousands of pages into a few hours worth of time. The results are… mixed, to say the least. The children being terrorized are pretty compelling, including young turns from Ginger Snaps‘ Emily Perkins and Robot Chicken‘s Seth Green. Then their adult versions come about – played by familiar TV actors – who… aren’t as compelling. To say the least. You may be dreading any of the moments where a kid or Pennywise aren’t on the screen.

To dissect all three hours of It, Thomas brings aboard Christopher G. Moore, Dave Dreher, and Adam Thomas. The four praise Tim Curry’s iconic performance as Pennywise and are desperate to find something else that would be considered worth watching. There’s plenty to dig at, from the Stephen King cliches to the infamous ending. Of course, the optimism comes in where the upcoming It film can diverge from this adaptation. Hopefully, there’ll be fewer questions of whether Prince Albert is in a can and if he can be let out. WAH HA! WAH HA! WAH HA!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

The Sixth Sense (1999)